Fernbank Forest Spring Tree Planting

March 9, 2017 at 2:32 pm Leave a comment

A large-scale ecological restoration project has been underway in Fernbank Forest for the past few years. While this process mostly involves the careful extraction of nonnative, invasive plant species, it also includes some targeted plantings.

On Saturday, February 25, volunteers, staff and board members planted 26 native tree species as part of the restoration. Species included northern red oak, white oak, blackgum, sassafras and hickory to name just a few.

The plantings took place in an area formerly inundated with bamboo, chocolate vine (Akebia) and Chinese wisteria. The trees fill gaps that were left once the majority of the invasive plants were removed. The trees also provide food for pollinator species, habitat for other organisms, and help prevent soil erosion.

We look forward to maintaining these plantings and watching these trees grow over the coming years and decades.

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Be a part of the restoration and preservation of Fernbank Forest—become a volunteer!

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About

At Fernbank Museum, there’s much more than dinosaurs and giant-screen films. Even with our website, e-newsletters, Facebook pages and Twitter updates, there’s still a lot we’d like to share with you. This blog is an opportunity for the people that keep Fernbank running and constantly expanding, to share stories from their point of view. We hope you’ll enjoy these first-hand, behind-the-scenes glimpses of what goes into keeping a world-class natural history museum running. As always, we’d love to hear your feedback on these stories, to hear your personal experiences and hear any suggestions for topics. Happy reading!

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